MISSION INTANGIBLE

M:I Products

MISSION:INTANGIBLE, the blog of the Intangible Asset Finance Society, offers critical comments on intangible asset, corporate reputation, and finance; supplemented by quantitative reputation metrics. Intangible assets include business processes, patents, trademarks; reputations for ethics and integrity; quality, safety, sustainability, security, and resilience; and comprise 70% of the average company's value. MISSION:INTANGIBLE is a registered trademark of the Intangible Asset Finance Society.

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Reputation Now Key at Consumer Level

C. HUYGENS - Thursday, August 24, 2017
Reputation risk is a material threat to value especially in financial services, automotive and healthcare.

"CorpSumers feel so strongly about brand reputation, that over half (51%) will continue buying a product that has disappointed them because they believe in the company or share its values."

Read more in Holmes Report.

Executives Become the Personification of Stakeholder Dissatisfaction

C. HUYGENS - Wednesday, July 26, 2017
"Whenever there’s a corporate misstep, stakeholders, from activist investors to customers to politicians, are giving public voice to their anger through social media, doing damage not only to corporate brands, but to individuals in corporate leadership positions.…The executives who are vilified during a crisis become the personification of stakeholder dissatisfaction. When they are targeted, the personal losses can be devastating."

Read more in the CEO World.

Email Reputation Risk: Summer 2017 Edition

C. HUYGENS - Wednesday, July 19, 2017
Reputational risk is the risk of a verdict of culpability with prejudice and damages for emotional harm in the court of public opinion. The purpose of a reputation risk management strategy is to foster reputational resilience and a verdict of exculpation due to mitigating factors, according to Nir Kossovsky of Steel City Re.

“The entire notion of reputational risk is essentially a battle for the mind of the stakeholder. When a bad thing happens — as they always do — will the stakeholder say, ‘Yeah, that’s a bad thing, but it’s such a good company. It’s unfortunate, but they’re good people and they’ll recover.’  Or will they say ‘Yep, that’s what we expected. That’s a bad company and that’s one more thing we expected to come out of them.’”

Reputation risk management products such as insurances that behave like warranties help foster reputational resilience.

Read more in the Business Insurance.

Reputation of Global Economy Impaired

C. HUYGENS - Monday, May 29, 2017
US consumers’ trust deficit is permanent, expectations reset, #reputation impaired. #risk

As Allianz’s chief economic adviser Mohamed El-Erian puts it: “You cannot underestimate the economic and political effects of the profound loss of trust that the public has had in the core managers of the global system.” Rebuilding that trust would be the best kind of fiscal stimulus. But it will require heavy lifting.

Read more in the Financial Times.

Expectations for Cyber Security

C. HUYGENS - Saturday, May 13, 2017
Reputation risk results from emotionally charged disappointment brought on by perceived failures in ethics, innovation, quality, safety, sustainability and security. Patients and regulators expect reasonable security; known vulnerabilities create #reputation #risk. Use NIST 800-53.

Authorities around the world are scrambling to tackle one of the most virulent cyber attacks to date, as fears mount over the safety of huge amounts of sensitive data, ranging from medical records to corporate databases. Hospitals across the UK have been severely disrupted; postal delivery and logistics services hit in the US and university networks in China shut down. Some of Europe’s biggest companies have been affected, including Telefónica, the Spanish mobile phone giant, Deutsche Bahn, the German national railway operator and Renault, the French carmaker. Russia’s interior ministry said more than 1,000 of its computers had been taken offline.

Read more in the Financial Times.

Silicon Valley Reputation At Risk Over Trust

C. HUYGENS - Monday, May 08, 2017
Talk about emotionally-charged disappointment: “From terrorist content, sexism claims and trolls to mind-reading privacy invasion, unpaid tax and robots taking jobs, the charge sheet is growing rapidly. Technology executives risk attracting an opprobrium that is traditionally reserved for bankers.”

From terrorist content, sexism claims and trolls to mind-reading privacy invasion, unpaid tax and robots taking jobs, the charge sheet is growing rapidly. Technology executives risk attracting an opprobrium that is traditionally reserved for bankers. Stories have emerged of tech billionaires building bunkers in New Zealand to hedge against a revolt by the 99 per cent.

Until recently, the technology sector has been more trusted than any other. In the latest Edelman annual survey, 76 per cent of people trust technology companies, compared with about 60 per cent for most industries and 54 per cent for finance.

That trust underpins Silicon Valley’s economic miracle almost as much as the technology. The halo of pioneering innovation for the advancement of humankind — embodied by Apple’s “think different” slogan and Google’s “don’t be evil” motto (now abandoned) — makes consumers feel good.


Read more in the Financial Times.

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